Professional Practice Series

LPO

We are delighted to inform you that NELTA, having a formal agreement with British Council, Nepal is publishing a series of materials for the development of English language teachers provided by British Council, Nepal. These materials contain both conceptual as well as practical ideas on improving teaching practice. The series includes 12 articles on a wide range of themes like ‘Evaluating and Assessing Learning’, ‘Using Multilingual Approaches’ and ‘Integrating ICT’ to name a few. As per our agreement with the British Council, we will publish an article every month for a year. We hope that these articles will help you develop your understanding, skills and confidence in the key areas that a language teacher comes across.

Please do not forget to respond to the British Council about your use of the ideas mentioned at the end of the article under the heading “Over to you”. Doing so, you can get a chance to win a free seat on British Council’s teacher training workshop – Fundamentals of Teaching.

Series Coordinator

Laxmi Pd. Ojha



 Register and Appropriacy-10

Dear valued readers,

Thank you very much for reading and responding to the previous articles in this series. For this new issue, we have included an article by Katherine Bilsborough on Register and Appropriacy.

This article briefly explains the importance of being aware of the contextual use of language. As language teachers, we need to understand and help our students understand that the language used in formal and informal setting is different. In another words, we need to make appropriate use of the language.  The article presents some examples of how the same ideas is conveyed in different way in formal and informal setting. It also presents the differences between the spoken versus written English.

Like in the past issues, it includes some useful vocabulary and an activity that teachers can do with their students to help them understand the difference between formal versus inform and written versus spoken English. We hope that this article helps you develop understanding about importance of using different language according to the context.

You can download the PDF version of the article by clicking on the link below.

Register-and-Appropriacy

Please do not forget to respond to British Council and NELTA ELT Forum about how you use the board in your lass and the ways teachers can make it more effective.



Error Correction Codes-9

 

This article  by Kevin Thomson briefly explains the importance of correcting learners’ errors. It also talks about different techniques that can be used to correct errors committed by the learners. Besides, it provides some error correction codes that teachers can use to make their error correction effective.

Very often, we teachers do not give importance to correction of the students work but if we continue ignoring the mistakes that they make, the errors may develop into habit. Therefore, we need to pay attention to the errors and provide suggestions to the students so that they can improve their language. At the same time, we should avoid paying attention to details unnecessarily so that the students do not feel demotivated to do the task in the future. Thus, we should know how to create a balance in the error correction process. One way to do so can be using some codes to indicate the errors so that learners work on identifying the exact error and improve their weaknesses themselves. This will save teacher’s time and will also make the learners independent.

Like in the past issues, this article includes some useful vocabulary items related to evaluation and assessment of learner’s work. It also contains an activity that you can work on to improve your error correction practice. We hope that this article helps to improve your skills to correct your learners’ errors.

You can download the PDF version of the article by clicking on the link below.

Error_Correction_Codes

Please do not forget to respond to British Council and NELTA ELT Forum about how you correct your learners’ errors so that other teachers can adopt them in their classes.



Board Work – 8

Thank you very much for reading and responding to the previous articles in this series. For June and July 2016 issue, we have included an article by Katherine Bilsborough on Board Work.

This article briefly explains the importance of managing the board for effective teaching learning process. It contains ideas on how to improve board work, drawing on the board, organising the board, using the board in class and using board creatively.

As teachers, we use board in our class everyday for various purposes like presenting grammar points, providing important notes, drawing picture, presenting the list of vocabulary items, etc. Therefore, it is important for us to explore how to maximize the use of the board so that student learning is fostered. If we can make use of the board effectively, it can help us teach the lesson effectively. Board work can help teachers motivate the students and present their classroom activities in an organized way. Using the board can be a rewarding experience if we make proper use of it. For this, we need to think of the best possible way to manage the board work. We have to know how to organize our board and engage students with this important classroom resource so that we teach our lessons in a more systematic way.

Like in the past issues, this article includes some useful classroom phrases and an activity that teachers can do to check and develop their understanding of effective use of board work. We hope that this article helps you know how to use the board in the class better and encourages you to use it more creatively.

You can download the PDF version of the article by clicking on the link below.

Article 8__Board Work

Please do not forget to respond to British Council and NELTA ELT Forum about how you use the board in your lass and the ways teachers can make it more effective.



Pair and Group Work- 7

Thank you very much for reading and responding to the previous articles in this series. For April-May 2016 issue, we have included an article by Kevin Thomson on Pair and Group Work

This article briefly explains the importance of managing the lesson and particularly focuses on using pair and group work to engage learners in various interactive activities in a language class.

It is important for teachers to understand that they should engage the learners in a variety of interactional activities so that the students do not lose interest in the activities and lessons. Sometimes, the students might feel hesitant to interact and take part in the activities. Therefore, the teacher should keep on monitoring the students and encourage them.

Like in the past issues, this article also includes some useful classroom phrases and an activity that teachers can do to engage learners in interaction. We hope that this article encourages you to engage your students in meaningful interaction in as systematic way.

You can download the PDF version of the article by clicking on the link below.

Article 7__Pair and Group Work

Please do not forget to respond to British Council and NELTA ELT Forum about what activities you use to understand your learners’ preferences before designing classroom activities and how they benefit you to teach better.



Understanding Learners’ Preferences- 6

Thank you very much for reading and responding to the previous articles in this series. For March 2016 issue, we have included an article by Katherine Bilsborough on Understanding Learners’ Preferences.

This article briefly explains the importance of understanding the learners’ preferences before designing the activities in a language class. It also includes an activity that teachers can use to find out the nature and preferences of the learners.

Teachers should always try to understand the preferences of their learners. It helps them understand what kind of activities, materials and interaction the learners like or do not like. The teachers should know their learners prefer to learn individually or in group; either they learn by reading books or by interacting in class. Based on these types of information, teachers can give tasks to their students. It is also important for the teachers to create equal opportunities for all the learners and treat them as individuals so that they develop to their potential.

Like in the past issues, this article also includes some useful classroom phrases and an activity that teachers can do to find out the preferences of their learners. We hope that this article encourages you to try to understand your learners’ personal choices before you design activities and materials to use in your class so that they best fit to motivate the learners to learn the target language.

You can download the PDF version of the article by clicking on the link below.

Article 6_Understanding Learners’ Preferences

Please do not forget to respond to British Council and NELTA ELT Forum about what activities you use to understand your learners’ preferences before designing classroom activities and how they benefit you to teach better.



Understanding Learners: Getting Feedback- 5

Thank you very much for reading and responding to the previous articles in this series. For February 2016 issue, we have included an article by Kevin Thomson on Getting Feedback from learners.

The article contains brief explanation of what feedback, questionnaire and motivation mean to teachers. It has highlighted the importance of collecting feedback from the learners to know how they feel about our teaching so that we can improve ourselves.

Success in teaching cannot be achieved over night. It demands hard work and dedication to continuously improve various skills related to teaching profession. One of the best ways to know the areas for improvement in our teaching skill is to ask students to give feedback on how they feel about different activities and materials used in our lessons. It is important for a teacher to know what learners like and do not like in her lessons. By doing so, she can get the exact picture of her strengths and weaknesses. Continuously working on these areas helps her develop better skills and be an effective teacher. Listening their voice also motivates the learners to take part in classroom activities happily and improves their learning.

The article has provided some sample responses from the learners that reflect their feedback to a teacher’s lesson. We hope that this article encourages you to collect your learners’ feedback and improve the areas that you still need to work on to be a better teacher.

You can download the PDF version of the article by clicking on the link below.

Article 5__Getting Feedback from Learners

Please do not forget to respond to British Council and NELTA ELT Forum about how you prepare and select your resources and what benefits you gain doing so.



Selecting Resources -4 

Thank you very much for reading and responding to the previous articles in this series. For January 2016 issue, we have included an article by Kevin Thomson on Selecting Resources. This article contains some vocabulary items related to resources for language teaching. It particularly focuses on how teachers can make use of the locally available and contextually relevant materials for teaching language successfully.

One of the roles that teachers have to take to be successful is to plan and prepare resources for their lessons. Therefore, it is important for teachers to know how to prepare and select the materials for their lessons. These materials and resources that we use in our class are important for both learners and teachers as they make both teaching and learning easier and lively.

Materials used in our lessons should be closer to our life situations so that students are motivated to use the language in a meaningful way. Some of the materials that can bring language learning closer to the students’ life are realia, pictures, bus timetables, tourist brochures, etc. Since the learners come across these resources frequently in their life outside the classroom, they are motivated to talk about them. This engages them in practice of the target language and helps in achieving the lesson goals.

We hope that this article encourages you to prepare and use the resources from around your locality so that you do not need to spend (much) to manage resources for your lessons.

Selecting Resources

Please do not forget to respond to British Council and NELTA ELT Forum about how you prepare and select your resources and what benefits you gain doing so.

Wish you a happy and prosperous year ahead!

 



Planning Lessons and Courses- 3

Thank you very much for reading and responding to the previous articles in this series. For December 2015 issue, we have included an article by Katherine Bilsborough on Planning Lessons and Courses. This article contains some vocabulary items related to preparation/planning of a lesson, areas that teachers need to plan before entering the class and activity for planning lessons and courses. It particularly focuses on describing assumptions and potential problems that a teacher may face in an EFL class.

Planning a lesson in advance has numerous advantages for both teachers and students. We should be aware of the fact that planning lesson is one of the key factors for success in teaching. It is an activity of thinking about what you will teach (the objectives) and how your will do it (activities and materials). Doing so, you can maintain focus of the lesson on target effectively. Using a planned lesson, you can feel confident that you are leading towards the right destination and will achieve the desired outcomes at the end of the class.

Planning alone may not guarantee success but it can help a teacher tech better to a great extent. A well planned lesson keeps both teachers and students on track which ultimately leads to timely completion of the lesson and better achievements. You can assume the level of the learners and be prepared to tackle the potential problems that they may face while learning the target language item. Moreover, reviewing the lesson after you come out of the class can be a wonderful way to improve your teaching skills. This ultimately helps in your continuous professional development.

We hope that this article encourages you to plan your lessons in advance so that you become a more successful teacher.

Article 3_Planning Lessons and Courses



Peer Observation-2

For November 2015 issue, we have included an article by Kevin Thomson on Peer Observation. This article contains some vocabulary items related to peer observation, useful phrases that teachers can use before/during peer observation and activity for organizing peer observation.

Developing professional skills is very much challenging in a country like Nepal where we lack adequate ideas and resources to support ourselves. But as the proverb goes –where there is a will, there is a way- teachers can develop an association with other like-minded professionals and collaborate to learn from each together. By doing so, they can help each other develop their teaching skills.

Peer observation is based on the idea that every teacher has some unique ideas to deal with different situations and topic areas and there is something to learn from every one. Peer observation is beneficial for both teachers (teaching and observing) because they can gain insight and provide feedback by having discussion about the activities carried out by one of the teachers. As peer observation does not include merely being in another teacher’s class; the observer teacher should also provide some feedback or suggestions for improvement. This ultimately benefits both of them.

We hope that this article encourages you to collaborate with a teacher in your locality to learn and help him/her learn English language teaching skills.

peer-observation-by-kevin-thomson


Assessing Learning:  Self- and Peer Assessment-1

For the October 2015 issue, we have included an article by Kevin Thomson on Assessing learning 1: Self- and peer assessment. This article contains some vocabulary items related to assessment, useful classroom phrases, activity on self-assessing and peer-assessing writing and training students to give their classmates feedback.

Assessing Learning – Self- and peer assessment

%d bloggers like this: